All questions answered about the Delta variant

Headline All questions answered about the Delta variant

A slide presentation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday has laid forth new details on how dangerous the delta variant is.

One chart says that the variant could be as infectious as chickenpox, which is one of the most transmissible viruses out there.

CDC says it spreads more easily than the common cold, smallpox and the 1918 flu.

The document was obtained and published by The Washington Post.

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It says that in addition to being more infectious, the delta variant likely increases the risk of severe disease and hospitalization.

A summary slide says that due to the delta variant, the world should “acknowledge that the war has changed.”

Furthermore, it recommends that the world ramp up communications so the public can understand that vaccines still considerably reduce the risk of death and severe disease.

While most fresh infections are still occurring among unvaccinated people, the CDC says that 35,000 fully vaccinated Americans — out of 162 million — may get infected with the virus every week.

The CDC data says over 80% of current cases of the coronavirus are the delta variant.

Headache, sore throat, coughing, shortness of breath, runny nose, and a change of taste and smell are the classic symptoms of the delta variant.

The US has done an about-face on its approach to the pandemic this week. Vaccine mandates are looming, masks are back, and officials seem more worried than they have in months.

President Joe Biden said, on Thursday, that every government employee or contractor would be required to say whether they are vaccinated, and those who are not must have a mask on the job – practice social distancing and submit to a virus test at least once a week. Driving the are two things: The rapid spread of the delta variant and a large number of Americans who remain unvaccinated.

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